Lullabies B

Baby beds

Baby bye, here’s a fly

Baby mine

Baby Moses lullaby

Baby’s bed’s a silver moon

Baloo baleerie

Barn sull / Child’s lullaby

Barnyard lullaby

Beautiful dreamer

Bed is too small

Bedtime

Black sheep, black sheep

Bossy-cow, bossy-cow

Brahms’ lullaby

Bye, baby bunting

Bye, bye, baby, baby bye

Last updated: 2/8/2021 11:07 AM

The songs below are compiled, illustrated and sometimes adapted by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2008 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

 

 

Baby beds O

 

 


A traditional bedtime rhyme.

It is an ideal song for adding extra verses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Little lambs, little lambs,

Where do you sleep?

‘In the green meadow,

With mother sheep.’

Little lambs, little lambs,

Where do you sleep?

‘In the green meadow,

With mother sheep.’

That's where the little lambs sleep.

 

Little birds, little birds,

Where do you rest?

‘Close to our mother

In a warm nest.’

Little birds, little birds,

Where do you rest?

‘Close to our mother

In a warm nest.’

That's where the little birds rest.

 

Baby dear, baby dear,

Where do you lie?

‘In my warm bed,

With Mother close by.’

Baby dear, baby dear,

Where do you lie?

‘In my warm bed,

With Mother close by.’

That's where the baby sleeps.


 

 

Baby bye, here's a fly 🔊

 

 


By Theo. Tilton and Geo. B. Loomis. Published in Songs for Little Folks’ published by Biglow & Main, New York, 1875. You can find the words of all eight verses at: http://www.hymnary.org/hymn/S4LF1875/page/131.

Music arranged by Dany Rosevear  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Baby bye, here's a fly;

Let us watch it, you and I,

How he crawls up the walls,

Yet he never falls!

I believe, with those six legs,

You and I could walk on eggs!

There he goes, on his toes,

Tickling baby's nose!

 

Spots of red dot his head;

Rainbows on his wings are spread!

That small speck is his neck;

See him nod and beck!

I can show you, if you choose,

Where to look to find his shoes:

Three small pairs made of hairs

These he always wears.

 

Black and brown is his gown;

He can wear it upside down!

It is laced round his waist;

I admire his taste!

Pretty as his clothes are made,

He will spoil them, I'm afraid,

If to-night he gets sight

Of the candle-light!

 

'Round and 'round on the ground,

On the ceiling he is found.

Catch him? No; let him go!

Never hurt him so!

Now you see his wings of silk

Drabbled in the baby's milk!

Fie! oh fie! foolish fly!

How will you get dry?

 

Flies can see more than we,

So how bright their eyes must be!

Little fly, mind your eye,

Spiders are near by;

For a secret I can tell,

Spiders will not treat you well!

Haste away, do not stay,

Little fly. good day!


 

 

Baby mine 🔊

 

 


Just love this song! It is by the engaging GRAMMY award winning Okee Dokee Brothers. Be sure to visit their site to find more of their delightful music.

Used with permission.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


You're my little sweetheart, baby mine,

You're my little sweetheart, baby mine,

You're the sugar lump in my tea,

You're my homemade recipe,

You're my little sweetheart, baby mine.

 

I'll love you till forever, baby mine,

I'll love you till forever, baby mine,

Five, four, three, two , one,

Forever's just begun,

I'll love you till forever, baby mine.

 

Someday you'll be singing, baby mine,

Someday you'll be singing, baby mine,

That day's comin' soon,

When you'll sing your child this tune,

Someday you'll be singing, baby mine.

 

Still you'll, be my baby, baby mine,

Still you'll, be my baby, baby mine.

 

Goodnight little darlin’, baby mine,

Goodnight little darlin’, baby mine,

Tonight I hope you dream

Of seeing’ things I’ve never seen,

So, goodnight little darlin’, baby mine.


 

 

Baby Moses lullaby 🔊

 

 


Words by Florence Mary Hoatson (1881–1964), music by Carey Bonner 1912 http://www.hymntime.com/tch/htm/b/a/b/m/babmoses.htm .

Arranged by Dany Rosevear

1. Hold baby, make hands ripple outwards, cup hands and rock. 2. Place hands in front of face with fingers stretched upwards, wag finger. 3. Hand to forehead, finger to lips, point to self, hand to ear. 4. Make hands ripple outwards, hands to cheek, throw out hands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Who will take little baby?

“I,” said the water deep.

“Baby will float in his cradle boat

And I shall rock him to sleep.”

 

Who will hide little baby?

“We,” said the rushes tall.

“Safely we’ll hide the baby inside,

So nobody sees him at all.”

 

Who will watch o’er the baby?

Miriam whispers, “I.

I’m sure to hear if the baby dear

Gives even a tiny, soft cry.”

 

Who will guard little baby?

Out on the waters blue?

Silently sleep, baby, safely sleep,

We all will take care of you.


 

 

Baby’s bed’s a silver moon O

 

 


This song has been sung by many parents and grandparents since ‘The slumber boat’ was first written in 1898 by Alice C.D. Riley with music by Jessie L. Gaynor. The words of the version below has changed slightly over the years from -‘Baby’s boat’s a silver moon’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Baby's bed's a silver moon,

Sailing in the sky,

Sailing o'er the sea of sleep,

While the stars go by.

 

Sail, baby, sail,

Far across the sea.

Only don't forget to come,

Back home again to me.

 

Baby's fishing for a dream,

Fishing near and far,

Her line a silver moonbeam is,

Her bait a silver star.

 

Sail, baby, sail,

Far across the sea.

Only don't forget to come,

Back home again to me.


 

 

Baloo baleerie 🔊

 

 


This lullaby from Scotland also called ‘The Bressay lullaby’ and is from the Shetlands; my friend who comes from Glasgow was not familiar with this song.

Find out more about the words of this song at:  http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=21937

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Chorus:

Baloo baleerie, baloo baleerie,

Baloo baleerie, baloo balee.

 

Gang awa' peerie faeries,

Gang awa' peerie faeries,

Gang awa' peerie faeries,

Frae oor ben noo.

 

Doon come the bonny angels,

Doon come the bonny angels,

Doon come the bonny angels,

Tae oor ben noo.

 

Sleep saft my baby,

Sleep saft my baby,

Sleep saft my baby,

In oor ben noo.


 

 

Barn sull / A child’s lullaby 🔊

 

 


This Scandinavian lullaby was probably adapted from a Slavic song – the minor key tune sounds a very familiar one but as yet I have been unable to identify it, any help would be appreciated!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Now my child is sleeping,

All is quiet here.

Happy birds are singing

A lullaby so dear.

Dream of woodland animals

And birds upon the wing,

Dream of summer and fairy tales,

And I will softly sing.


 

 

Beautiful dreamer 🔊

 

 


A parlor serenade by Stephen Foster 1826-1884. Find out more here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Beautiful dreamer, wake unto me,

Starlight and dewdrops are waiting for thee.

Sounds of the rude world heard in the day,

Lulled by the moonlight have all passed away

Beautiful dreamer, queen of my song,

List while I woo thee with soft melody.

Gone are the cares of life's busy throng,

Beautiful dreamer, awake unto me,

Beautiful dreamer, awake unto me!

 

Beautiful dreamer, out on the sea,

Mermaids are chanting the wild Lorelei,

Over the streamlet vapors are borne,

Waiting to fade at the bright coming morn.

Beautiful dreamer, beam on my heart,

E'en as the morn on the streamlet and sea;

Then will all clouds of sorrow depart,

Beautiful dreamer, awake unto me,

Beautiful dreamer, awake unto me!

 

Barnyard lullaby O

 

 


Sleep time on the farm, This one comes from ‘Merrily, merrily’ a lovely collection of nursery songs and rhymes by the Nursing Mother’s Association of Australia.

It is a traditional German lullaby translated by Beatrice P. Krone. It would be great to have the text in German!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Moo, little cow, moo,

Turtle dove, coo-coo-roo-coo,

Puppy dog, puppy dog, bow, wow, wow,

Kitty cat, kitty cat,meow, meow, meow,

Rooster cock-a-doodle-doo,

Sleep till night is through.


 

 

Bed is too small 🔊

 

 


A plea for sleeping in the open air and the rustling of leaves; this lullaby has been popular with the scouting movement since the 1960s, it can be found in ‘Songs for Canadian Girl Guides’, Girl Guides of Canada, 1981.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bed is too small for my tiredness;

Give me a hillside with trees.

Tuck a cloud up under my chin.

Lord, blow the moon out, please!

 

Rock me to sleep in a cradle of dreams;

Sing me a lullaby of leaves.

Tuck a cloud up under my chin.

Lord, blow the moon out, please!


 

 

Bedtime O

 

 


This poem by Thomas Hood has been slightly adapted for singing and for a picture book. You can find the original version in ‘The Book of 1000 Poems’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The evening is coming, the sun sinks to rest;

The birds are all flying straight home to the nest.

"Caw!" says the crow as he flies overhead,

“It's time little people were going to bed!”

 

The flowers are closing, the daisy's asleep;

The primrose is buried in slumber so deep.

Shut up for the night is the pimpernel red;

“It's time little people were going to bed!”

 

The butterfly, drowsy, has folded its wing;

The bees are returning, no more the birds sing.

Their labour is over, their nestlings are fed;

“It's time little people were going to bed!”

 

Here comes the pony, his work is all done;

Down through the meadow, he takes a good run;

Up go his heels and down goes his head;

“It's time little people were going to bed!”

 

Good night, little people, good night and good night;

Sweet dreams to your eyelids till dawning of light;

The evening has come, there's no more to be said,

It's time little people were going to bed!

 

 

Black sheep, black sheep 🔊

 

 


An Appalachian lullaby. The refrain in this song is also found in ‘All the little horses’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Black sheep, black sheep where'd you leave your lamb?

Way over in the valley.

The bees and the butterflies are buzzing 'round his eyes

And the poor little thing's crying "Mammy".

My mother told me before she went away

To take good care of the baby

But I went to play and the baby ran away

And the poor little thing's crying "Mammy".

Black sheep, black sheep where'd you leave your lamb?

Way over in the valley.

 


 

 

 

Bossy-cow, bossy-cow O

 

 


This lovely American lullaby was published in 1912 in ‘The Little Mother Goose’ by the ‘Good housekeeping magazine’ see: http://www.centurybabies.com/story/story14.html

Dany Rosevear wrote the melody below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bossy-cow, bossy-cow, where do you lie?

In the green meadow under the sky.

Billy-horse, billy-horse, where do you lie?

Out in the stable with nobody nigh.

 

Birdies bright, birdies sweet, where do you lie?

Up in the tree-tops,-oh, ever so high!

Baby dear, baby love, where do you lie?

In my warm crib, with Mamma close by.


 

 

Brahms’ lullaby /  Lullaby, and good night 🔊

 

 


This song and in particular the soporific melody is probably the most well known lullaby in the western world.Guten Abend, gute Nacht’ was dedicated to a friend of Brahms on the birth of her second son and published in 1868; you can find out moreabout the story at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahms%27_Lullaby .

 

There have been many translations / interpretations of this lullaby into English over the years some conforming more strictly to the religious intent of the time it was written; I have just tweaked one of the more secular traditional ones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lullaby, and good night,

With roses and starlight,

And lilies softly spread

Round my baby's sweet head.

Lay thee down now, and rest,

May thy slumber be blessed.

Lay thee down now, and rest,

May thy slumber be blessed.

 

Lullaby, and good night,

Thy mother's delight,

Little angels at your side,

My darling abide.

Soft and warm is your bed,

Close your eyes and rest your head.

Soft and warm is your bed,

Close your eyes and rest your head.


 

Bye, baby bunting O

 

 


A classic lullaby to explain to a young child why father was away from home.

There are so many slight differences in the wording of this song. I think the one below is how I remembered it as a child – oh, for a perfect memory!

Another version goes:

Bye, baby bunting,

Father's gone a-hunting,

Mother's gone a-milking,

Sister's gone a-silking,

Brother's gone to buy a skin

To wrap the baby bunting in.

It is suggested that ‘bunting’ is associated with the plumpness of a baby:  http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2010/04/1697.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bye, baby bunting,

Daddy's gone a hunting,

He’s gone to fetch a rabbit skin,

To wrap the baby bunting in.

Bye, baby bunting.


 

 

Bye, bye, baby, baby bye 🔊

 

 


A lullaby from the Southern Appalachians. Verses two and three are by Anne Mendoza from Sociable songs 1 published 1970 OUP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bye, bye, baby, baby bye:

My little baby, baby bye.

 

Hush, my baby, baby bye:

Hush, little baby, baby bye.

 

Sleep, my baby, baby bye:

Sleep, little baby, baby bye.

 

Bye, bonny baby, baby bye:

My little baby, baby bye.

 


 

 

 

Castle of Dromore 🔊

 

 


Sometimes called ‘October winds’, this ‘Irish folk song’ was written by Sir Harold Boulton to a traditional tune. It was later popularised by the Clancy Brothers in the 1960s, which is when I first came across this haunting song.

Find out more at: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=77129

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


October winds lament around the castle of Dromore,

Yet peace is in her lofty halls, my loving treasure store,

Though autumn leaves may droop and die, a bud of spring are you.

Sing hushabye loo la loo la lan,

Sing hushabye loo la lo.

 

Bring no ill winds to hinder us, my helpless babe and me,

Dread spirits of the blackwater, Clan Owen's wild banshee,

And Holy Mary pitying us, in Heaven for grace doth sue.

Sing hushabye loo la loo la lan,

Sing hushabye loo la lo.

 

Take time to thrive my ray of hope, in the garden of Dromore.

Take heed young eaglet till thy wings are feathered fit to soar.

A little rest and then the world is full of work to do.

A little rest and then the world is full of work to do.

Sing hushabye loo la loo la lan,

Sing hushabye loo la lo.

 


 

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