Autumn songs  T-Z

The Autumn leaves have fallen down

The Autumn wind

The country farmer’s vainglory / Harvest home

The farmer gathers his hay today

The farmer sows his seeds

The hayride road

The journey of the leaves

The Little Red Hen

The loaf of bread

The tree in the wood

Tick tock change the clocks

What have you brought for harvest time?

What shall we do on a nice Fall day?

When Mary goes walking

Yellow the bracken

Also find:

Pick up a leaf

The leaves are green

The leaves had a wonderful frolic

 

Last updated: 10/10/2017 4:19 PM

The songs below are part ofAway we gocompiled, adapted and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

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To listen to music from these songs click on 🔊

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

© Dany Rosevear 2013 All rights reserved

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.


 

The Autumn leaves have fallen down O

 

Once the leaves have fallen off the trees there is a lot of work to do.

 

Make the actions suggested by the words.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The autumn leaves have fallen down,

Fallen down, fallen down;

The wind it came and blew them round,

And blew them all around.

 

We’ll find a brush and start to sweep,

Start to sweep, start to sweep,

We’ll pile them into a great big heap,

Into a great big heap.

 

The bonfire’s lit and burns them away,

Burns them away, burns them away;

And now they’re gone we’ll dance and play,

We’ll dance and we will play.

 


 

 

The Autumn wind 🔊

 

 


The wind sings to the leaves, the birds and mother.

From ‘Songs of a Little Child's Day’ with words by Emilie Poulsson and music by Eleanor Smith. Music arranged by Dany Rosevear.

 

Can easily be dramatized as a movement activity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


With whistle and shout,

The wind hurried out

And called to the leaves on the trees:

"Come down from the bough,

I'll dance with you now,

And whirl you as fast as you please!"

 

The wind sang aloud

Where birds in a crowd

Were ling'ring before their long flight;

"Away, little friends,

Till wintertime ends;

There may be a snowstorm tonight."

 

The wind gave a roar,

And shook the house door.

"I hear you!" the good mother said:

"Bring cold or bring storm,

My children are warm,

Tucked under thick blankets in bed!"


 

 

 

The country farmer’s vainglory / Harvest home  🔊

 

 


This baroque song was written by John Dryden, with music composed by Henry Purcell in 1611. It can be found in the gentleman’s magazine 1894:  https://archive.org/stream/gentlemansmagaz43unkngoog/gentlemansmagaz43unkngoog_djvu.txt

Find out more at: http://www.fresnostate.edu/folklore/ballads/CeCo376.html

It was customary to deck the last ‘harvest load’ with boughs of oak and ash, sometimes men were sent to ring the church bell or hand bells were rung on the wagon. Find the last verse in: https://archive.org/details/englishfolkrhyme00nortuoft .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Our oats they are hoed, and our barley's reaped,

Our hay it is mowed, and our hovels heaped;

Harvest home! Harvest home!

We'll merrily roar out our harvest home,

Harvest home! Harvest home!

We'll merrily roar out our Harvest home!

 

We cheated the parson, we’ll cheat him again;

For why should the Vicar have one in ten?

One in ten, one in ten,

For why should the Vicar have one in ten?

 

For staying while dinner is cold and hot,

And pudding and dumplings are burnt to pot;

Burnt to pot, burnt to pot!

Till pudding and dumplings are burnt to pot.

 

The boughs they do shake and the bells do ring,

So merrily comes our harvest in,

Our harvest in, our harvest in.

So merrily comes our harvest in.

 


 

The farmer gathers his hay today O

 

An action game for harvest time by Wendy Bird.

 

1. Mime swaying hay, cutting it down and putting it together and shaking it dry.

2. Mime picking up apples and eating them.

3. Mime swaying corn, stretching arms up high, cutting it down and gathering it together.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The farmer gathers his hay today,

It’s harvest time.

The farmer gathers his hay today,

It’s harvest time.

He cuts it down and stacks it high,

Gives it a shake, then leaves it to dry.

The farmer gathers his hay today,

It’s harvest time.

 

The farmer gathers his apples today,

It’s harvest time.

The farmer gathers his apples today,

It’s harvest time.

Red and rosy, juicy and sweet,

Lots of apples for us to eat.

The farmer gathers his apples today,

It’s harvest time.

 

The farmer gathers his corn today,

It’s harvest time.

The farmer gathers his corn today,

It’s harvest time.

It grows up high , turns golden brown,

And then he comes to cut it down.

The farmer gathers his corn today,

It’s harvest time.

 


 

The farmer sows his seeds O

 

A singing game for harvest time.

 

A small group of children (the seeds) and a farmer stand in the centre of a circle. The children in the circle make  actions to suit the words and each time ‘Oats, beans and barley-O ’is sung they stamp feet and turn round.

The seeds grow slowly as the farmer goes about his work. As the ‘sheaves’ verse is sung the circle holds hands and walk in with hands raised high and then out again. Children all clap in time to the music on the last verse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The farmer sows his seeds,

The farmer sows his seeds,

Oats, beans and barley-O

The farmer sows his seeds.

 

The wind begins to blow...

The rain begins to fall...

The sun begins to shine...

The wheat begins to grow…

The plants grow big and tall...

The farmer cuts the corn...

The binds the sheaves...

And now the harvest’s in....


 

 

The hayride road 🔊

 

 


The words of this delightful harvest time song by MaryLee Sunseri,© 2003, harks back to an older pastoral age when singing in the fields and on wagons cheered the agrarian communities and made the hard work easier to bear.

The ‘Turkey in the Straw’ music will be familiar to many.

Find out more about Mary Lee Sunseri’s music at: http://www.maryleemusic.com/uploads/3/9/4/3/3943366/mother_goose_melodies_lyrics.pdf   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Oh! We went on a hayride by early mornin’ light!

We were bumpin’ to the left, we were bumpin’ to the right!

We were bouncin’ up and down on the hayride road,

And we left mighty early when the rooster crowed:

Chorus: Cock-a-doodle-doo! Cock-a-doodle-doo!

Cock-a-doodle-doo! Cock-a-doodle-doo!

Bouncin’ up and down on the hayride road,

And we left mighty early when the rooster crowed!

 

Oh, the hayride stopped at the old fishin’ hole

So we hopped off the wagon with our fishing poles!

We were catchin’ ‘em big! We were catchin’ ‘em small

But we threw ‘em all back when the rooster called:

Chorus

 

Then the hayride stopped at the big cow barn!

So we milked the cows and we fed ‘em corn!

And we played with the piggies in the little pig pen,

But the rooster crowed, it was time to go again!

Chorus

 

Oh, the hayride stopped by the old apple tree

And we picked all the apples that we could see!

We were thinkin’ of cookin’ up a big apple pie,

But the rooster crowed and it was time to say “Goodbye!”

Chorus

 

Well, the hayride dropped us at our front door,

But we begged and we begged, “Can we go some more?”

Well, my Ma said, “Yep!” and my Pa said “Yes!”

Then the rooster crowed and I know you know the rest!

Chorus x2

 


 

 

The journey of the leaves 🔊

 

 


A song written by Homer H. Harbour to a German folk tune from the book ‘140 folk-songs’ published1922. Here it is adapted by Dany Rosevear.

 

It could easily be dramatized as a hand play or movement activity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


"Come away," sang the river

To the leaves on a tree;

"Let me take you on a journey

If the world you would see."

 

So the leaves gently falling

From the tree on the shore,

Flowed away on the river

To come home never more.


 

 

The Little Red Hen 🔊

 

 


A story song adapted by Louise B. Scott with music  by Lucille F. Wood; from ‘Singing fun’ 1954. Arranged and adapted by Dany Rosevear.

 

A song made for dramatizing; sit children in a circle with a small number taking turns to be the farmyard animals. The children in the circle could enhance the performance with percussion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


"Who will plant this wheat?"

"Not I," said the dog.

"Not I," said the cat.

"Not I," said the pig.

"Then I will," said the Little Red Hen.

And she did!

 

"Who will cut this wheat?"…

"Who will thresh this wheat?"…

"Who will go to the mill?"…

"Who will bake this bread?"…

 

"Who will eat this bread?"

"I will," said the dog.

"I will," said the cat.

"I will," said the pig.

"Then I will," said the Little Red Hen.

 

They would not help a single bit,

So the Little Red Hen ate all of it!


 

 

 

The loaf of bread  🔊

 

 


This harvest time song was originally written by P. Lancourt but very little can be found about its origins.

I have adapted the words to make them more gender neutral and to make the verses shorter. The tune is an arrangement by Dany Rosevear. To shorten the song even more some verses can be combined instead of singing the chorus between each verse.

 

It was suggested to me that this could be done as a hand play.

An alternative would be dramatic play in a circle game with children acting out roles in the centre or taking turns round the ring to dramatise jobs; the circle skips round during the chorus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


My mother called to me,

And this is what she said,

"Go down to the store,

And buy a loaf of bread.”

 

Chorus: I danced off so happily,

As happy as could be,

To buy a loaf of bread,

For mother and me!

 

The storekeeper listened,

And this is what was said,

“We’ll go to the baker,

And fetch that loaf of bread.”

We talked to the baker,

And this is what was said,

“The miller has the flour,

To bake the loaf of bread.”

 

We went to the miller,

In a windmill oh so neat,

“Go down to the farmer,

And there you’ll find the wheat.”

We came to the farmer,

A-milking a brown cow,

Who sent us to the blacksmith,

For to get a plough.

 

The farmer ploughed the field,

The wheat it grew so high,

It was taken to the miller,

When the grain was nice and dry.

The miller ground the wheat,

Ground it up so fine,

And put it in a strong sack,

All sewed about with twine,

     Chorus

 

While the baker made the dough,

We went to get the coal

A miner dug it out

Of a dark and spooky hole.

The dough was kneaded well,

The coal was glowing red,

The dough went in the oven,

And out came crusty bread.

     Chorus

 

The storekeeper wrapped it,

And gave it straight to me,

I took it home to mother,

And we had it for our tea!


 

 

 

The tree in the wood O

 

Several versions of this cumulative song were collected by Cecil Sharp in the Southern Appalachians at the beginning of the 20th century. This is a simple version for younger children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


All in a wood there grew a tree,

The finest tree you ever did see,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves grew all around, around, around,

And the green leaves grew all around.

 

And on this tree there was a branch,

The finest branch you ever did see,

The branch was on the tree,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves…

 

And on this branch there was a nest,

The finest nest you ever did see,

The nest was on the branch,

The branch was on the tree,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves …

 

And in this nest there was an egg,

The finest egg you ever did see,

The egg was on the nest,

The nest was on the branch,

The branch was on the tree,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves …

 

And on this egg there was a bird,

The finest bird you ever did see,

The bird was on the egg,

The egg was on the nest,

The nest was on the branch,

The branch was on the tree,

The tree was in the wood,

And the green leaves …

 


 

Tick tock change the clocks O

 

Remembering what happens when the clocks change is not easy; this song should help you. Explain the words ‘clockwise’ and ‘anticlockwise’. Illustrate by moving the clock’s minute hand. How many minutes are passed when moving this hand forward or back one hour.

 

Year

Clocks go forward

Clocks go back

2013

31 March

27 October

2014

30 March

26 October

2015

29 March

25 October

Hold hands and stand in a circle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tick tock, tick tock!

Remember, remember, retain and recall,

The clocks turn back one hour in the Autumn or Fall,

The mornings are lighter, the afternoon’s dark,

REMEMBER!

Spring forwards, Fall back,

Rise up with the lark.

 

Tick tock, tick tock!

Remember, remember, it’s a difficult thing,

The clocks are turned forward one hour in the Spring,

The mornings are darker, the afternoon’s light,

REMEMBER!

Spring forwards, Fall back,

Then you’ll get it right.

Stamp round clockwise.

 

Walk anticlockwise.

Skip round.

Stop.

Move into the circle and then back.

Bend knees then stretch up high.

 

Move as before but walk anticlockwise and then clockwise.

 


 

 

What  have you brought for harvest time? 🔊

 

 


A Harvest Festival song by Dave and Toni Arthur. A time to think of those in need; collect together harvest gifts ready for distribution through church or charity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


What have you brought for harvest time,

What have you brought for harvest time,

What have you brought for harvest time,

To put on the harvest table?

 

I have brought a loaf of bread,

To put on the harvest table.

 

I have bought six brown eggs… tin of beans…

 

I have bought some apples and pears…

a bunch of flowers…

 

I have bought a cabbage green…

a corn dolly for luck…

 

We hope you like our harvest food, x3

That we’ve put on the harvest table.


 

 

What shall we do on a nice Fall day 🔊

 

 


Discuss all the different activities that are fun to do in the Autumn; blackberrying, finding shiny conkers, acorns and sycamore seeds and of course those below, then get out in the fresh and mime tasks or even better do them!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


What shall we do on a nice Fall day,

A nice Fall day, a nice Fall day?

What shall we do on a nice Fall day,

When we go out to play?

 

We’ll rake the leaves on a nice Fall day…

We’ll jump in leaves on a nice Fall day…

We’ll pick apples on a nice Fall day…

 


 

 

When Mary goes walking  🔊

 

 


A delightful poem by Patrick Reginald Chalmers (1872—1942).

The second two lovely verses are by Reg Down © Copyright 2015.

Find the whole song with a further verse at: http://static1.1.sqspcdn.com/static/f/708722/25856935/1427395600127/when-mary-goes-walking-poem.pdf?token=0Sa2I6Dwc595CLDLprH584K3ZWs%3D

And for more about this wonderful wordsmith visit: http://www.tiptoes-lightly.net/authors-tale/

Music by Dany Rosevear©

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


When Mary goes walking

The autumn winds blow,

The poplars, they curtsey,

The larches bend low;

The oaks and the beeches

Their gold they fling down,

To make her a carpet,

To make her a crown.

To make her a carpet,

To make her a crown.

 

When Mary goes wand’ring

The sun shines like gold,

The wheat and the barley,

Their goodness unfold;

The larks in the meadow

Praise her from the sky,

And sing her a glad song

Till evening is nigh.

 

When Mary is sleeping

The autumn stars shine,

They twinkle and shimmer

In darkest night time;

The moon with its waxing

And waning on high,

Whispers its secrets

For Mary’s delight.


 

 

Yellow the bracken O

 

 


A colourful picture of Autumn brilliantly evoked in this short poem by Florence Hoatson. The gentle melody by Dany Rosevear was written to reflect an end to lazy summer days.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Yellow the bracken,

Golden the sheaves,

Rosy the apples,

Crimson the leaves;

Mist on the hillside,

Clouds grey and white.

Autumn, good morning!

Summer, good night!

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