Animaux grands

Ah! Les crocodiles

Danse de l’ours

J’ai vu le loup

Monsieur l’Ours

Qui a peur du loup?

Sardines et crocodiles

Un éléphant ça trompe

Un éléphant qui se balançait

 

Last updated: 5/5/2015 2:49 PM

 

The songs below are part of ‘Hop-!’ The French collection

compiled, adapted, translated and illustrated by Dany Rosevear

 

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To listen to music from these songs click on O

To watch the author sing a song click on the title at:

 

 

You are free to copy, distribute, display and perform these works under the following conditions:

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·       any of these can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder

 

Your fair use and other rights are no way affected by the above.

 

 

Ah! Les crocodiles O

 

Several French children’s songs originate from the military tradition. In this song with its steady marching beat, crocodile goes off to war leaving his family behind.

 

Watch at: http://www.wat.tv/video/ah-crocodiles-1llv1_2i4uv_.html

 

Practice different clapping sequences before playing this game.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Un crocodile, s’en allant à la exploré,

Disait adieu à ses petits enfants.

Traînant la queue, la queue dans la poussière,

Il s’en allait combattre les éléphants.

A crocodile went off to see the wide world,

He said his goodbyes to his children as he went,

Dragging his tail, his tail through all the deserts,

Boldly he went to fight the elephants.

 

Refrain

Ah! les cro, cro, Ah!les cro, cro,

Ah! les crocodiles,

Sur les bords du Nil, ils sont partis,

N’en parlons plus.

Ah! les cro, cro, Ah!les cro, cro,

Ah! les crocodiles,

Sur les bords du Nil, ils sont partis,

N’en parlons plus.

Oh! the croc, croc, Oh! the croc, croc,

Oh! the crocodi-iles,

From the Nile bank watch him leaving,

Leaves without a word.

Oh! the croc, croc, Oh! the croc, croc,

Oh! the crocodi-iles,

From the Nile bank watch him leaving,

Leaves without a word.

March round the room swinging arms. Wave to others when passing.

 

Find a partner and shake hands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clap own hands, partner’s right then partner’s left. Continue to repeat this pattern.

 

Clap a different pattern which might include a knee or hip slap.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Danse de l’ours O

 

Also called ‘Branle de l’ours’ this is included for its wonderful tune, no words to learn just concentrate on the steps.

 

Watch dancers at: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2x3hf_branle-de-lours_family.

 

Either make a circle, one circle inside another or a circle with three or four bears dancing individually in the middle. Hold hands in front bearlike and move them to the rhythm of the music. It is also danced holding hands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 Step to the left, cross right foot in front, step to the left, bring right foot next to the left.

‚ Make the same movement to the right.

Repeat this sequence four times.

ƒ Hop on left foot, right foot shake forward, hop on right foot, left foot shake forward.

„ Hop on left foot, right foot back, hop on right foot, left foot back.

… As ƒ but twice as fast without a shake.

†. As „ but twice as fast without a shake.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

J’ai vu le loup O

 

‘I saw the wolf, the fox, the weasel’ is a popular song from Medieval times still sung in France, Southern U.S.A. and Canada.

 

Watch at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DfPWEPP1T9s&feature=related

 

Children stand in groups of four, partners opposite each other. The dance begins with partners right palms together pointed upright. This is a challenging, lively, cumulative song. Simplify movements for younger children by simply walking to the right and left in one large circle and introduce each new action on its own.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


}x2

J’ai vu le loup, le renard et la belette,

J’ai vu le loup, le renard danser.

}x2

J’les ai vus taper du pied, x2

J’ai vu le loup, le renard et la belette,

J’ai vu le loup, le renard danser.

I saw the wolf and the fox and then the weasel...

I saw the wolf and the fox dancing.

Then I saw them stamp their feet...

 

J’ai vu le loup, le renard et la belette...

J’les ai vus taper du main, x2

J’les ai vus taper du pied, x2

Then I saw them clap their hands...

Then I saw them stamp their feet...

J’ai vu le loup...

 

In subsequent verses add:

J’les ai vus bien sautillez, x2

Then I saw them hop so well,

J’les ai vus se retournez, x2

Then I saw them turn around,

J’les ai vus se dandinez, x2

Then I saw them waddle so,

J’les ai vus se balancez, x2     

Then I saw them sway like this,

Partners walk round right palms flat together. Repeat with left palms. Stamp right then left foot.

Hold hands in group of four. Walk round to the left swinging arms. Repeat to the left.

 

As above with child diagonally opposite – right palms then left. Clap own hands then partners right, own hands partners left. Continue sequence.

Tap right then left foot.

Hold hands in group of four. Walk round to the left swinging arms. Repeat to the left.

 

 

 

Hop on right foot then the left.

 

Skip round with partner.

 

Do-si-do with partner.

 

Hold hands with partner and sway from side to side.

 

 


 

 

Monsieur l’Ours O

 

Mr. Bear likes to sleep but the children think it is time for him to wake up. The outcome is inevitable!

 

Sung by children on: http://perso.orange.fr/saintsernin/comp0001.htm

Watch at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FtpSAGYMmk.

 

Choose a child to be the bear. As a variation introduce two or three bears.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Monsieur l’Ours réveille toi,

Tu as bien trop dormir comme ça.

Au bout de trois réveille-toi.

Monsieurl’Ours s’éveillera!

Un! Deux! Trois!

l’Ours: JE DORS

ou l’Ours: GRRR! JE SORS!

 

Mr. Bear wake to our song,

You have slept for far too long.

When we count three you must wake up.

Mr. Bear you will wake up!

One! Two! Three!

Bear: I’M SLEEPING

or Bear: GRRR! I’M LEAVING

All join hands and creep in a circle around the sleeping bear.

Hold up three fingers.

Cup hands round mouth.

Count to three.

Listen to response with hand behind the ear.

Mr. Bear decides whether to carry on sleeping (no more than two JE DORS!) or to leap up to catch the children, who on his words, run and hide. The one caught becomes the next Mr. Bear as the game is repeated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Qui à peur du loup O

 

Many folk stories for children around the world feature the wolf, a creature of the collective imagination, exciting both fear and respect. Young children will enjoy this song for the thrill of the dangerous as in ‘Who’s afraid of the big bad wolf?’

There are now only a very few wolves in France, perhaps fifty or so. In some parts of Europe such as Spain and Italy their numbers are much greater.

 

Watch at: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xiyvms_qui-a-peur-du-loup_music#

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Qui à peur du loup,

De ses yeux filou?

Qui à peur du loup?

C’est Jeannette et Jeannou.

Who’s scared of the wolf,

With his rascally eyes?

Who’s scared of the wolf?

It is Jeannette and John.

 

Peur pour deux moutons,

Moutons doux et bons.

Peur pour deux moutons,

C’est Jeannette et Jeannou.

Afraid for their two sheep,

Sheep so soft and good.

Afraid for their two sheep,

It is Jeannette and John.

 

Creep around in pairs with hand to eyes looking out for the wolf, high, low and side to side all around the room.

Huddle together on the last line.

 

 

 

 

Et les deux agneau,

Petits et petiots.

Et les deux agneau,

C’est Jeannette et Jeannou.

And for their two lambs,

Tiny and so small.

And for their two lambs,

It is Jeannette and John.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Sardines et crocodiles O

 

A traditional song from the Vendée and what a load of nonsense it is! But with its delightful calypso rhythm, this dance would be enhanced by an accompanying percussion band including maracas and similar instruments, see www.dailymotion.com/video/x2sp62_sardines-et-crocodiles_music

 

Split the class into sardines and crocodiles. The crocodiles in lines of four or five hold on to the waist of the child in front.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Sardines et crocodiles et croqueda gueda,

Et ratchitchi et ratchatcha,

Sardines et crocodiles et croqueda gueda,

Ce ne sera pas toi le chat! MIAOU!

 

Sardines and crocodiles and crocodi geda,

And ra chi chi and ra cha cha,

Sardines and crocodiles and crocodi geda,

It won’t be you, it is the cat! MIAOW!

The ‘head’ of the crocodile opens and closes its jaws with arms outstretched. The rest of the line do a conga dance – skip, right leg out, skip, left leg out. Sardines swim in and out of the weaving crocodiles keeping away from their open mouths.

 

All children stop on the last line, point to each other and give a big ‘MIAOW!’

Play music so sardines and crocodiles can change roles ready for a repeat performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Un éléphant, ça trompe O

 

A keen knowledge of imagery in the French language is necessary to appreciate the multi layers of meaning in this nonsense marching song. In particular the pun on the word ‘trompe’ can also mean ‘trunk’ or ‘trumpet’ and also ‘to mislead’ or ‘deceive’ as in ‘trompe d’oeil

 

Watch at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ib3zBfCY3AE

 

To simplify replace ‘La peintur’à l’huile…’ etc. with ‘La la la’. And as an alternative move to the following words:

 

A little sparrow hopping

Un p’tit moineau sautille, sautille,

Un p’tit moineau sautille énormément.

La la la la la la la la lère,

La la la la la la la.

 

A kangaroo jumping

Un kangourou ça saute, ça saute…. Refrain

A little horse galloping

Un p’tit cheval galope, galop….

Refrain

 

A little mouse scurrying

Un p’tit souris trottine, trottine….

Refrain

 

A little child dancing

Un p’tit enfant ça danse, ça danse…. Refrain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


A. Un éléphant ça trompe, ça trompe,

Un éléphant ça trompe énormément.

B. La peinture à l’huile,

C’est difficile,

Mais c’est bien plus beau

Que de la peinture à l’eau.

Un! Deux!

 

One elephant deceives us, deceives us,

One elephant deceives incredibly.

Painting well in oils,

Can be quite a toil,

But a finer thing

Than water colouring.

 

C. Deux éléphants ça trompe, ça trompe,

Deux éléphants ça trompe énormément.

D. La peinture à l’huile,

C’est difficile,

Mais c’est bien plus beau

Que de la peinture à l’eau.

Un! Deux! Trois!

A. March on the spot clapping hands, singing first two lines.

B. March singly around room waving trunk.

Stamp and clap Un! Deux!

Find a partner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. Repeat A. standing side by side.

D. March around room one behind the other waving trunks. Stamp and clap to Un! Deux! Trois! Arrange selves in groups of three (Quite tricky but do-able!)Continue to add one more to each group. Some groups will need to split. and join other groups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Un éléphant qui se balançait O

 

Find a very different version of this song in ‘Hop, skip and away we go!’

A similar one to this is sung with verve by class 2 at the Lycée franco-finlandais d'Helsinki at: http://www.tkukoulu.fi/~clanttila/chansons/.

 

Watch another game at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1KKgO--gxk

 

Practice walking heel to toe in time to the music before attempting this game as these movements demand a high level of physical control. You will need plenty of room and a safe surface on which to fall at the end of the song! Finishing with a tumble will teach the children to be considerate of other members of the group – great fun too!

Sit in a large circle, 2 or 3 leaders should be spaced inside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Un éléphant qui se balançait,

Sur une toile, toile, toile, toile d’araignée,

Trouvait ça tellement, tellement amusant,

Que bientôt, que bientôt…

Un! Deux

Ils étaient deux éléphants.

One elephant carefully balancing,

On a spider’s web he wobbled, such a crazy thing,

Oh he laughed and he cried with big tears in his eyes,

You must come join the fun…

One! Two!...

Now there were two great elephants.

 

Deux éléphants qui se balançaient, etc.

Un! Deux! Trois!…

Ils étaient trois éléphants.

 

Continue until:

Dix éléphants qui se balançaient,

Sur une toile, toile, toile, Toile d’araignée,

Trouvaient ça tellement, tellement amusant,

Que tout d’un coup, Boum badam boum!

Then all at once they tumbled down!

With an arm waving like a trunk the leaders plod along putting heel in front of the toe.

 

Each leader then chooses another child from the circle. This child places a hand on the leader’s shoulder and waves a ‘trunk’ with the other.

 

 

 

Sequence is repeated as above

As before

Encourage the leader of the line of elephants to search for a place away from the others, where it is safe for the group to fall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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